All posts by Lucy Morrison

ESRC Festival of Social Science – Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults from Financial Scamming

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Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults from Financial Scamming

An ESRC Festival of Social Science event to showcase recent research and best practice responses dealing with the threat posed by financial scams.

Date: Tuesday 10th November | Time: 09:45 – 15:00 | Venue: Hamworthy Club Ltd, Magna Rd, Wimborne BH21 3AP
We would like to say a big thank you for your attendance, we hope you enjoyed the event.
Here you will find all the materials we used throughout the event.
We look forward to seeing you at our future events. If you have any questions, queries or ideas for future events please do not hesitate to contact us pqsw@bournemouth.ac.uk

National Competence Framework for Safeguarding Children

National Competence Framework ChildrenNational Competence Framework for Safeguarding Children

This document complies with legislation, statutory guidance and best practice in relation to the safeguarding of children. Local Safeguarding Boards should take account of local needs, including an assessment of the effectiveness of multi-agency training to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people (Munro, 2011).

This document incorporates the recommendations from Professor Eileen Munro’s review into Child Protection in England and Wales.

The aim of the National Competence Framework, as with other publication in this series – National Capability Framework for Safeguarding Adults – is to provide a baseline for standards of competence that individuals can expect to receive from those professionals and organisations, who are tasked with Safeguarding Children.

It also provides employees and employers with a benchmark for the minimum standard of competence required of those who work to safeguard children across a range of sectors.

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Nutrition and Caring for Older People Living in the Community course

AFN certified course

Dr. Jane Murphy and Joanne Holmes have developed a new and innovative training programme: ‘Nutrition and Caring for Older People Living in the Community’.

What?

This course will improve your knowledge and understanding of nutrition and hydration and develop key skills in planning to promote health and wellbeing for older people living in the community. You’ll be able to improve practice and increase your confidence in the provision of appropriate nutrition and hydration for older people in line with Care Quality Commission’s requirements Outcome 5 ‘Meeting Nutritional Needs’ and other key national guidelines and initiatives on nutrition for older people in care.

Who?

The course is designed for those who have:

1) Professional and organization responsibility for the care and nutritional management of older people such as registered nurses, social workers, community and domiciliary workers, front-line managers.

2) Strategic responsibility for ensuring that their organization is fully committed to meeting nutritional standards of care and have appropriate systems and resources to support these requirements such as operational managers, care home owners, heads of support service/assessment.

How?

The programme comprises a one day in class workshop combined with a workbook that provides information and training on ‘Nutrition and Caring for Older People’.

You have the opportunity to take an assessment through completion of this workbook and a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate your competences for the ‘Fundamentals of Human Nutrition’ (Competence 1; Level 3) of the Quality Assurance Framework in Nutrition.

The course can also be linked with the Skills for Care qualifications framework for ‘Food Safety and Nutrition’ (level 2 or 3).

We can offer flexible learning to suit your own requirements or a package of training for your organization as well as impact evaluation of the learning in the workplace.

For further details and informal enquiries, contact Jane Murphy at: jmurphy@bournemouth.ac.uk


 

Understanding Nutrition and Dementia

Evidence based learning to enhance dignity in dementia care.

Ensuring appropriate food and nutrition is vital from delivering dignity in care for people with dementia.

To find out more please visit – www.bournemouth.ac.uk/nutrition-dementia

Safeguarding Adults and Mental Capacity Conference

Safeguarding Adults and Mental Capacity Conference

The much awaited Safeguarding Adults and Mental Capacity Conference was held on Friday 16th November, we would like to thank the four keynote speakers and all that attended for making this such an interesting and successful day.

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The National Centre for Post Qualifying Social Work is a leading provider of post qualifying social work education and CPD in the UK.  We are committed to supporting professionals, and the organizations they work in, to improve practice with those who use health and social care services.  As part of our commitment to the sector we hosted this conference and offered it free to attendees.

Professionals in health and social care settings are required to make difficult decisions in complex situations, where safeguarding an adult at risk of harm and issues around mental capacity are at the forefront of practice. Increasingly practitioners, and the organisations they work in, are required to both empower and protect those most vulnerable in society; however, promoting liberty, autonomy and protection can be a difficult balancing act.   The question many professionals are asking is how do we apply adequate safeguards to ensure an appropriate balance between the right of the individual to live their lives as they choose without interference from the state and a professional duty to ensure individuals at risk of harm are protected?

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At the heart of the Safeguarding Adults and Mental Capacity Conference was a desire to contribute to this debate and develop professional knowledge to support decision making when supporting those adults most vulnerable and at risk of harm without compromising those same individuals right to live their life as they choose. 


 

Opening Video introducing the National Centre for Post-Qualifying Social Work.

If you would like to see this video on YouTube, click here.

Child Protection in a time of austerity

Child Protection in a time of austerity: 

Incorporating critical thinking and relationship based interventions with complex families

We would like to extend our thanks to everyone who attended this event, especially the wonderful speakers who made it such an interesting and informative day.

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The National Centre for Post Qualifying Social Work is a leading provider of post qualifying social work education and CPD in the UK.  We are committed to supporting professionals, and the organizations they work in, to improve practice with those who use health and social care services.  As part of our commitment to the sector we hosted this conference and offered it free to attendees.

To read the press release, please click here.

Conference Summary

We recognise that this is a challenging time for the social work profession and statutory social work in particular. The Munro Review of Child Protection highlighted the complex nature of child protection work and the importance of ensuring that the professional judgement of social workers working with children and families with complex problems is of a high calibre.

Set against a backdrop of welfare reform, marketisation of services and austerity measures, the National Centre for Post-Qualifying Social Work is pleased to have brought you our first child protection conference, which focused on:

  • Critical reflection in child protection
  • Reflective leadership and the consequences of diminishing services
  • The role of supervision

 

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Feedback

Your feedback about this conference will help us make improvements for the next one.

Please leave your comments below.

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Children and Domestic Abuse Workshops

Thanks!

Thanks to all who attended the Children and Domestic Abuse Workshops and provided such interesting and informed discussion of the issues surrounding domestic violence and its impact on young people. As promised, please find below the workshop materials and group work from the day.

abuse-workshopsHelen’s presentation

Activities

Different types of abuse (post its activity)

What children may say or do to communicate that they are in distress both consciously and unconsciously

What possible responses might there be from a member of staff who suspected that a child in their care was at risk – how might this differ between experienced and inexperienced staff

The Warn DVD is available for purchase at: http://www.helennelder.com/warn/trainingpack.shtml

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Children and domestic abuse workshops

29th October 2013

Helen Nelder has teamed up with The National Centre for Post-Qualifying Social Work at Bournemouth University to deliver a structured, half-day programme of training for front line and support workers whose clients have experienced domestic abuse.

Programme

Training is divided into 2 morning sessions and comprises a mix of presentations and interactive exercises, with information about national and local services. After the structured training is complete Helen is available to stay on and answer questions. Support for delegates who may be affected by any of the issues raised will be available throughout the day. A quiet area is also available.

Session 1

With the aid of video clips of her acclaimed play, w@rn, Helen presents a powerful and articulate analysis of her own experience of surviving an abusive relationship. Participants are also divided into smaller groups for Helen to run interactive exercises using a variety of stimulus materials. Groups discuss different subjects relating to domestic abuse and present their conclusions to the audience. With a view to refining and raising standards, Helen invites delegates to consider what it is like to be a victim in a place of supposed safety – your own home.

Session 2

Presentation from University and Helen of relevant information for delegates e.g. local and national organizations that deal with domestic abuse, diversity, forced marriage, FGM.

Training objectives

  • Enable participants to understand how it actually feels for adults and children to live in an abusive relationship
  • Demonstrate the impact that domestic abuse has on the lives of the families of victims
  • Motivate and challenge delegates to improve their professional practice
  • Improve inter-agency partnership and working relationships and facilitate the necessary development of a unified approach to domestic abuse

Helen-NelderAbout the speaker

Helen Nelder is a theatrical writer whose acclaimed play, w@rn, is a moving and gritty exploration of middle class domestic abuse.   Helen has been raising awareness of domestic abuse issues as a speaker since the play’s first performance in 2000. Based on meticulous research and personal experience, both w@rn and the W@rn DVD Training Pack have been used extensively in training, nationally and abroad.   Helen has been providing domestic abuse education and training for a wide variety of organizations around the country for a number of years, including Home Office Conferences, Victim Support Conferences both nationally and regionally, the Magistrates Association and the judiciary, as well as Community Safety teams and regional branches of Women’s Aid, Sussex and Hampshire Police.

Violence in Relationships – It’s not normal

“It’s not normal … its normalised”

Violence and control in intimate teenage relationships

 

The National Centre for Post Qualifying Social Work was delighted to host an event for the Bournemouth University Festival of Learning 2014. Thank you to everyone that attended the event, if you would like to know more about the research undertaken at the centre, please do not hesitate to get in touch with our research team by completing the contact form below.


 

Event

‘It’s not normal’: Exploring violence within teenage relationships
Domestic violence is often seen as something that only occurs between adult partners and usually within a family setting. Adolescence is the time when most young people have their first experiences of building intimate partnerships and violence in these relationships is often overlooked.

Suitable for a general audience, including professionals, parents and young adults.

Run by: Jenny Bigmore and Helen Nelder.


 

About the speaker: Helen Nelder

Helen NelderHelen Nelder is a theatrical writer whose acclaimed play, w@rn, is a moving and gritty exploration of middle class domestic abuse.

Helen has been raising awareness of domestic abuse issues as a speaker since the play’s first performance in 2000. Based on meticulous research and personal experience, both W@rn and the W@rn DVD Training Pack have been used extensively in training, nationally and abroad.

Helen has been providing domestic abuse education and training for a wide variety of organizations around the country for a number of years, including Home Office Conferences, Victim Support Conferences both nationally and regionally, the Magistrates Association and the judiciary, as well as Community Safety teams and regional branches of Women’s Aid, Sussex and Hampshire Police.

More information

If you would like to know more about CATCAM, to get involved in future research or have any questions about our work, please  complete the contact form below.

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Mental Capacity Act 2005 Workbook for Practitioners

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This flip reverse workbook on the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards has been designed and developed by the National Centre for Post-Qualifying Social Work at Bournemouth University in partnership with Learn to Care, the professional association of workforce development managers in local authorities.

This is an accessible and informative workbook, packed full of case studies, activities and advice about the Mental Capacity Act 2005. We hope it will support practitioners to improve their professional practice and develop their knowledge and skills within key legislative and ethical frameworks.

Click here to order

At the end of each workbook is a quiz, see below for the quiz answers.

Mental Capacity Act 2005 workbook

QUIZ ANSWERS

You should have a tick in each of the following boxes.

1. a, b, d & g

2. a, b, d & e

3. a, c & e

4. a, c, e & f

5. a, c, e & f

6. b

7. b

8. b

9. c, d & f

10. a, c, e & f

 

Sample answer to question on page 13:

This is all perfectly legal and Peter will be able to sign up for all utilities as long as he has capacity. It is the capacity which is key, not his inability to sign his name.

Sample answer to question on page 17:

You would assess capacity according to the two stage test within the Act. Does Mr Jones have an impairment or disturbance in the functioning of the mind or the brain and if so does that impairment mean he cannot decide to agree to have a bath? Can he understand why he needs a bath, can he retain information you give him about the bath, can he use that information to make his decision and can he communicate his decision to you. It would be appropriate to involve his family and any other professional working with him in the assessment process. If you are uncertain, you might seek advice from your manager or from your MCA Lead. Recording of the assessment should be made in Mr Jones’ file, using any relevant local paperwork if available.

Sample answer to question on page 24:

The first step would be to assess his capacity as above. If you believe that he doesn’t have capacity then you would follow the best interests checklist as set out in the Code of Practice. This would include consulting with his family to get their views on your intended actions. Assuming, as a result of following the checklist that you believe it is in Mr Jones’ best interests then you would go ahead and proceed with the bath, recording your actions from the point where you assessed his capacity in Mr Jones file.

Sample answer to question on page 29:

Negotiation is your best option here but as this concerns treatment, it might be useful to involve an advocate, possibly an IMCA if you believe that Shakira’s family are not acting in her best interest. Situations of this type can often be caused by poor communication between professionals and families and an advocate might help in this regard. If negotiation does not allow a decision to be made the ultimate course of action would be to seek a declaration in the Court of Protection.

Sample answer to question on page 33:

It would appear that Mrs Collins has made a valid and applicable Advance Decision to Refuse Treatment. In this case, Mrs Collins’ wishes should be respected despite the feelings of the daughter. The GP and any specialist practitioner should explain the situation to the daughter. Ultimately, the decision will be made by the person in charge of Mrs Collins treatment, whether that’s the GP or a cancer specialist.

Mental Capacity Act 2005: Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards workbook

QUIZ ANSWERS

1. b

2. b

3. d

4. c

5. d

6. b

7. d

8. b

9. c

10. c

11. d

12. c

13. c